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How To Make Gedit More Programmer Friendly

LinuxToday.com - Fri, 04/20/2018 - 13:00

Gedit is the default text editor that comes pre-installed on Linux with GNOME as its desktop environment.

Categories: Linux

Kaspersky Lab Banned From Advertising on Twitter Because of Its Alleged Ties With Russian Intelligence Agencies

Slashdot.org - Fri, 04/20/2018 - 13:00
An anonymous reader shares a report: Russian cybersecurity company Kaspersky Lab has been banned from advertising on Twitter due to its allegedly close and active ties between the company and Russian intelligence agencies, according to the social network. The ban is the latest blow in an ongoing saga for Kaspersky, which includes two ongoing legal battles with the U.S. government. Eugene Kaspersky, CEO of Kaspersky Lab, took to Twitter on Friday to condemn the ban. A Twitter spokesperson reiterated that the "decision is based on our determination that Kaspersky Lab operates using a business model that inherently conflicts with acceptable Twitter Ads business practices."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Server Help by ccabay

Freelancer.com - Fri, 04/20/2018 - 12:35
Need help with libpcap, cap and node.js (Budget: $30 - $250 USD, Jobs: Javascript, Linux, node.js, NoSQL Couch & Mongo, Software Architecture)
Categories: Freelance, Linux

IT energy monitoring system by Chaddha14

Freelancer.com - Fri, 04/20/2018 - 12:05
I want a perl or python script, I want two distinct things to be done Item1 – will be able to ping a ip address range (or several ranges) e.g. 10.0.0.0/8. And then do the following if ping responds... (Budget: £20 - £250 GBP, Jobs: Linux, Perl, Python, Shell Script)
Categories: Freelance, Linux

Democratic Party Files Suit Alleging Russia, the Trump Campaign, and WikiLeaks Conspired To Disrupt the 2016 Election

Slashdot.org - Fri, 04/20/2018 - 12:05
The Democratic Party is suing Russia, the Trump campaign and the whistle-blowing website Wikileaks for conspiring to disrupt the 2016 presidential election. From a report: The multi-million-dollar lawsuit filed in Manhattan federal court says that "In the Trump campaign, Russia found a willing and active partner in this effort" to mount "a brazen attack on American Democracy," which included Russian infiltration of the Democratic Party computer network. The Trump campaign, according to the lawsuit, "gleefully welcomed Russia's help." The suit says that "preexisting relationships with Russia and Russian oligarchs" with Trump and Trump associates "provided fertile ground for [the] Russia-Trump conspiracy." The common purpose of the scheme, according to the Democratic National Committee, was to "bolster Trump and denigrate the Democratic Party nominee," Hillary Clinton, while boosting the candidacy of Trump, "whose policies would benefit the Kremlin." Tom Perez, chairman of the Democratic National Committee, said the party's suit "is not partisan, it's patriotic."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

security expert to get AWS db by chruchi402

Freelancer.com - Fri, 04/20/2018 - 12:01
I need a security expert. This is long term project. I am going to get any data from aws site. I have one tool. but If i use it, too long. My deadline is 5 days. If u are expert, we can work for... (Budget: $250 - $750 USD, Jobs: Amazon Web Services, Internet Security, Linux, System Admin, Web Security)
Categories: Freelance, Linux

Collabora Online 3.2 Brings More Powerful Features to LibreOffice in the Cloud

LinuxToday.com - Fri, 04/20/2018 - 12:00

Based on the LibreOffice 6.1 open-source office suite, Collabora Online 3.2 introduces support for creating and inserting charts into Writer and Impress documents

Categories: Linux

End of the Landline: BT Aims To Move All UK Customers To VoIP by 2025

Slashdot.org - Fri, 04/20/2018 - 11:40
BT aims to move its UK customers to IP telephony by 2025. From a report: BT is shutting its traditional telephone network in the UK, according to an email seen by The Register. The public switched telephone network (PSTN) closure is part of the company's plans to move in a fibre network direction in terms of its infrastructure. All phonecalls will eventually be made over broadband using VoIP systems, which means the company's existing wholesale line rental products, which are reliant on the PSTN, will need to be removed. BT Openreach runs the network used by all but one of the telecoms providers in the UK.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Drupal 8 install on web server by djsirny

Freelancer.com - Fri, 04/20/2018 - 11:34
Need help setting up Drupal 8 on web server. Along with core install would like setup of composer and a few libraries. (Budget: $30 - $250 USD, Jobs: CSS, Drupal, HTML, Linux, PHP)
Categories: Freelance, Linux

How Google autocomplete works in SearchHow Google autocomplete works in Search

GoogleBlog - Fri, 04/20/2018 - 11:30

Autocomplete is a feature within Google Search designed to make it faster to complete searches that you’re beginning to type. In this post—the second in a series that goes behind-the-scenes about Google Search—we’ll explore when, where and how autocomplete works.

Using autocompleteAutocomplete is available most anywhere you find a Google search box, including the Google home page, the Google app for iOS and Android, the quick search box from within Android and the “Omnibox” address bar within Chrome. Just begin typing, and you’ll see predictions appear:

In the example above, you can see that typing the letters “san f” brings up predictions such as “san francisco weather” or “san fernando mission,” making it easy to finish entering your search on these topics without typing all the letters.

Sometimes, we’ll also help you complete individual words and phrases, as you type:

Autocomplete is especially useful for those using mobile devices, making it easy to complete a search on a small screen where typing can be hard. For both mobile and desktop users, it’s a huge time saver all around. How much? Well:

  • On average, it reduces typing by about 25 percent
  • Cumulatively, we estimate it saves over 200 years of typing time per day. Yes, per day!

Predictions, not suggestionsYou’ll notice we call these autocomplete “predictions” rather than “suggestions,” and there’s a good reason for that. Autocomplete is designed to help people complete a search they were intending to do, not to suggest new types of searches to be performed. These are our best predictions of the query you were likely to continue entering.

How do we determine these predictions? We look at the real searches that happen on Google and show common and trending ones relevant to the characters that are entered and also related to your location and previous searches.

The predictions change in response to new characters being entered into the search box. For example, going from “san f” to “san fe” causes the San Francisco-related predictions shown above to disappear, with those relating to San Fernando then appearing at the top of the list:

That makes sense. It becomes clear from the additional letter that someone isn’t doing a search that would relate to San Francisco, so the predictions change to something more relevant.

Why some predictions are removedThe predictions we show are common and trending ones related to what someone begins to type. However, Google removes predictions that are against our autocomplete policies, which bar:


  • Sexually explicit predictions that are not related to medical, scientific, or sex education topics
  • Hateful predictions against groups and individuals on the basis of race, religion or several other demographics
  • Violent predictions
  • Dangerous and harmful activity in predictions

In addition to these policies, we may remove predictions that we determine to be spam, that are closely associated with piracy, or in response to valid legal requests.

A guiding principle here is that autocomplete should not shock users with unexpected or unwanted predictions.

This principle and our autocomplete policies are also why popular searches as measured in our Google Trends tool might not appear as predictions within autocomplete. Google Trends is designed as a way for anyone to deliberately research the popularity of search topics over time. Autocomplete removal policies are not used for Google Trends.

Why inappropriate predictions happenWe have systems in place designed to automatically catch inappropriate predictions and not show them. However, we process billions of searches per day, which in turn means we show many billions of predictions each day. Our systems aren’t perfect, and inappropriate predictions can get through. When we’re alerted to these, we strive to quickly remove them.

It’s worth noting that while some predictions may seem odd, shocking or cause a “Who would search for that!” reaction, looking at the actual search results they generate sometimes provides needed context. As we explained earlier this year, the search results themselves may make it clearer in some cases that predictions don’t necessarily reflect awful opinions that some may hold but instead may come from those seeking specific content that’s not problematic. It’s also important to note that predictions aren’t search results and don’t limit what you can search for.

Regardless, even if the context behind a prediction is good, even if a prediction is infrequent,  it’s still an issue if the prediction is inappropriate. It’s our job to reduce these as much as possible.

Our latest efforts against inappropriate predictionsTo better deal with inappropriate predictions, we launched a feedback tool last year and have been using the data since to make improvements to our systems. In the coming weeks, expanded criteria applying to hate and violence will be in force for policy removals.

Our existing policy protecting groups and individuals against hateful predictions only covers cases involving race, ethnic origin, religion, disability, gender, age, nationality, veteran status, sexual orientation or gender identity. Our expanded policy for search will cover any case where predictions are reasonably perceived as hateful or prejudiced toward individuals and groups, without particular demographics.

With the greater protections for individuals and groups, there may be exceptions where compelling public interest allows for a prediction to be retained. With groups, predictions might also be retained if there’s clear “attribution of source” indicated. For example, predictions for song lyrics or book titles that might be sensitive may appear, but only when combined with words like “lyrics” or “book” or other cues that indicate a specific work is being sought.

As for violence, our policy will expand to cover removal of predictions which seem to advocate, glorify or trivialize violence and atrocities, or which disparage victims.

How to report inappropriate predictionsOur expanded policies will roll out in the coming weeks. We hope that the new policies, along with other efforts with our systems, will improve autocomplete overall. But with billions of predictions happening each day, we know that we won’t catch everything that’s inappropriate.

Should you spot something, you can report using the “Report inappropriate predictions” link we launched last year, which appears below the search box on desktop:

For those on mobile or using the Google app for Android, long press on a prediction to get a reporting option. Those using the Google app on iOS can swipe to the left to get the reporting option.

By the way, if we take action on a reported prediction that violates our policies, we don’t just remove that particular prediction. We expand to ensure we’re also dealing with closely related predictions. Doing this work means sometimes an inappropriate prediction might not immediately disappear, but spending a little extra time means we can provide a broader solution.

Making predictions richer and more useful
As said above, our predictions show in search boxes that range from desktop to mobile to within our Google app. The appearance, order and some of the predictions themselves can vary along with this.

When you’re using Google on desktop, you’ll typically see up to 10 predictions. On a mobile device, you’ll typically see up to five, as there’s less screen space.

On mobile or Chrome on desktop, we may show you information like dates, the local weather, sports information and more below a prediction:

In the Google app, you may also notice that some of the predictions have little logos or images next to them. That’s a sign that we have special Knowledge Graph information about that topic, structured information that’s often especially useful to mobile searchers:

Predictions also will vary because the list may include any related past searches you’ve done. We show these to help you quickly get back to a previous search you may have conducted:

You can tell if a past search is appearing because on desktop, you’ll see the word “Remove” appear next to a prediction. Click on that word if you want to delete the past search.

On mobile, you’ll see a clock icon on the left and an X button on the right. Click on the X to delete a past search. In the Google App, you’ll also see a clock icon. To remove a prediction, long press on it in Android or swipe left on iOS to reveal a delete option.

You can also delete all your past searches in bulk, or by particular dates or those matching particular terms using My Activity in your Google Account.

More about autocompleteWe hope this post has helped you understand more about autocomplete, including how we’re working to reduce inappropriate predictions and to increase the usefulness of the feature. For more, you can also see our help page about autocomplete.

You can also check out the recent Wired video interview below, where our our vice president of search Ben Gomes and the product manager of autocomplete Chris Haire answer questions about autocomplete that came from…autocomplete!

Google Search Team Answers the Web's Most Searched Questions | WIREDA behind-the-scenes look at how Google autocomplete creates predictions to speed up searches, how inappropriate ones are dealt with and more about the feature.
Categories: Technology

Python Software development by tonykimar

Freelancer.com - Fri, 04/20/2018 - 11:25
I'm searching for a passionate python developer to work with us on our project for 2 weeks . The person we will consider must be well skilled, timely and responsible. Being able to communicate well in English is compulsory... (Budget: $750 - $1500 USD, Jobs: Docker, Linux, Python, Software Architecture, Software Testing)
Categories: Freelance, Linux

XFileSharing script installation and server config by copyB

Freelancer.com - Fri, 04/20/2018 - 11:21
Looking for a experienced developer in XFileSharing script installation We will spin a new server, with the OS the developer prefers with sudo access for the developer to do: - Linux cloud server... (Budget: €8 - €30 EUR, Jobs: Apache, HTML, Linux, MySQL, PHP)
Categories: Freelance, Linux

Video overview of MorphOS 3.10

OSNews.com - Fri, 04/20/2018 - 11:10
Morph.Zone reports: Dan Wood of kookytech.net has published a new MorphOS video that shows some of the new features of MorphOS 3.10 and demonstrates how to change the look of MorphOS in two easy to follow steps. Also the lastest issue of Amiga print magazine Amiga Future has a review of MorphOS 3.10 (reading excerpt).

The AMD 2nd generation Ryzen deep dive

OSNews.com - Fri, 04/20/2018 - 11:08
The headline results for the new processors are that they offer more performance than AMD’s first generation of Ryzen, use the same socket, are offered at similar prices, are competitive with the competition, and come bundled with some nice coolers. While the new Ryzen 2000-series processors are not enough to cause anyone that has already invested in Ryzen 1000-series to upgrade, AMD is offering a very attractive proposition to anyone two-to-three generations (or more) behind to upgrade into a high performance system. AMD's strong run in processors continues.

AI Can Scour Code To Find Accidentally Public Passwords

Slashdot.org - Fri, 04/20/2018 - 11:05
An anonymous reader shares a report: Researchers at software infrastructure firm Pivotal have taught AI to locate this accidentally public sensitive information in a surprising way: By looking at the code as if it were a picture. Since modern artificial intelligence is arguably better than humans at identifying minute differences in images, telling the difference between a password and normal code for a computer is just like recognizing a dog from a cat. The best way to check whether private passwords or sensitive information has been left public today is to use hand-coded rules called "regular expressions." These rules tell a computer to find any string of characters that meets specific criteria, like length and included characters.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Why Microsoft chose Linux for Azure Sphere

LinuxToday.com - Fri, 04/20/2018 - 11:00

LinuxGizmos: Analysis story on Microsoft Azure Sphere, with VDC analyst suggesting it's a strategic move against Amazon FreeRTOS in the IoT space.

Categories: Linux

Simplifying apps, desktops and devices with Citrix and Chrome EnterpriseSimplifying apps, desktops and devices with Citrix and Chrome Enterprise

GoogleBlog - Fri, 04/20/2018 - 11:00

As cloud adoption continues to accelerate, many organizations have found they need an ever-expanding fleet of mobile devices so that employees can work wherever and whenever they need. And research shows that when employees can work from anywhere, they can do more. According to Forbes, employee mobility leads to 30 percent better processes and 23 percent more productivity.

But as the demand for mobility grows, many organizations have also found themselves challenged by the need to provide secure mobile endpoints with access to certain legacy line-of-business or Windows apps. To help, last year we announced our partnership with Citrix to bring XenApp and XenDesktop to Chrome Enterprise.

Since bringing XenApp and XenDesktop to Chrome Enterprise, we’ve worked extensively with Citrix to help more businesses embrace the cloud. Last month, we announced that admins can now manage Chromebooks through several popular enterprise mobility management (EMM) tools, including Citrix XenMobile. And this year at HIMSS we showed how the combination of Citrix and HealthCast on Chrome Enterprise helps healthcare workers access electronic health records and virtualized apps securely on Chrome OS using their proximity badge.

All of this is the topic of an IDG webinar we’re co-sponsoring with Citrix. The webinar “Chrome OS & Citrix: Simplify endpoint management and VDI strategy” includes IDG CSO SVP/Publisher Bob Bragdon, Chrome Enterprise Group Product Manager Eve Phillips, and Citrix Chief Security Strategist Kurt Roemer as speakers, and addresses how Citrix and Chrome enable access to mission-critical business apps and create a productive workforce inside or outside corporate infrastructure.

Here’s what the webinar will cover:

  • How Chrome and Citrix can ensure secure access to critical enterprise apps.
  • How employees can be more productive through access to legacy apps in VDI. 
  • How Citrix XenApp (XA) and XenDesktop (XD) integrate with Chrome OS.
  • How Citrix’s upcoming product launches and enhancements with Chrome, GCP and G Suite can help enterprise IT teams and end users.

In March, Citrix’s Todd Terbeek shared his experiences transitioning to Chrome Enterprise, and this week Chief Security Strategist Kurt Roemer discussed how combining Citrix with Chrome can deliver expanded value across security, privacy and compliance. Our work with Citrix continues to evolve, and we’re looking forward to finding new ways to collaborate in the future.

To learn more, sign up for the webinar.

A new webinar, “Chrome OS & Citrix: Simplify endpoint management and VDI strategy,” addresses how Citrix and Chrome enable access to mission-critical business apps and create a productive workforce inside or outside corporate infrastructure.
Categories: Technology

How to Install Log.io Realtime Log Monitoring Tool on Ubuntu 16.04 LTS

HowtoForge.com - Fri, 04/20/2018 - 10:23
Log.io is a simple but effective log management tool built on top of Node.js and Socket.io that monitors the system and provides real-time information on the system logs in a web browser. In this tutorial, we will learn how to install Log.io on Ubuntu 16.04 LTS server.
Categories: Linux

AI Helps Grow 6 Billion Roaches at China's Largest Breeding Site

Slashdot.org - Fri, 04/20/2018 - 10:22
With the help of AI, folks at a Chinese pharmaceutical company are breeding cockroaches by the billions every year, South China Morning Post reports. From a report: Their purpose: To make a "healing potion" that can cure respiratory, gastric and other diseases. The "potion," consumed by over 40 million people in China, is made by crushing the cockroaches once they reach a desired weight and size, according to the publication. There is a "slightly fishy smell" to the potion, which tastes "slightly sweet" and looks like tea, it added. Some insects are known to have potential health benefits. Besides China's cockroach potion, scientists are also exploring how milk-like protein crystals in roaches could be an excellent source of calories and nutrition. Chewing down on bugs like crickets and mealworms can also give us more protein, according to studies.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

INTEGRATEUR KNX SIEMENS OZW by gjeancharles

Freelancer.com - Fri, 04/20/2018 - 10:16
Nous recherchons un développeur intégrateur pour finaliser une installation de télésurveillance de 2 chaufferies en petite couronne parisienne. Il s'agira de faire communiquer un OZW SIEMENS avec un régulateur... (Budget: €250 - €750 EUR, Jobs: Bash Scripting, Linux, Raspberry Pi)
Categories: Freelance, Linux
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